Gerald Asamoah

German association football player

Gerald Asamoah
Gerald Asamoah – Tag der Legenden 2016 02.jpg
Asamoah in 2016
Personal information
Full name Gerald Asamoah[1]
Date of birth (1978-10-03) 3 October 1978 (age 43)
Place of birth Mampong 22, Ghana
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)[2]
Position(s) Forward
Youth career
1990 VfV Hainholz
1990–1991 SG Borken
1991–1994 BV Werder Hannover
1994–1996 Hannover 96
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1996–1999 Hannover 96 79 (28)
1999–2010 Schalke 04 279 (44)
2004 Schalke 04 II 1 (0)
2010–2011 FC St. Pauli 27 (6)
2012–2013 Greuther Fürth 27 (5)
2013–2015 Schalke 04 II 49 (8)
Total 462 (91)
National team
2001–2006 Germany 43 (6)
Teams managed
2016–2021 Schalke 04 II
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

Gerald Asamoah (German pronunciation: [ˈgeːʁalt ʔazaˈmoːa]; born 3 October 1978) is a German football manager and former professional player who works as the first-team manager of Schalke 04.[3][4]

During his playing career, Asamoah played as a forward,[2][5] and he was mainly known for his pace, his physical strength and his hard-working approach.[6] He has bonded the most part of his career to Schalke, where he has been widely appreciated not only for his accomplishments as a player, but also for his relaxed and positive attitude and his role as a community leader off the pitch.[7][8]

Asamoah kept working in Gelsenkirchen after his retirement, too, as he was offered several administrative and managerial roles throughout the years.[3]

Early life

Born in Mampong, Ghana, Asamoah and his family emigrated to Germany in 1990.

He immediately started playing football in several local teams, and entered the youth academy of Hannover 96 at the age of 16.

Club career

Hannover 96

Coming through the youth ranks of Hannover, Asamoah started his professional career with the club from Lower Saxony, scoring five goals in his debut season. He first came to prominence the following year, as he scored 19 goals in 33 games (including a decisive winner in the final match against Eintracht Braunschweig) to help Hannover reach the play-off for the promotion in 2. Bundesliga.[8][9] Although Die Roten lost the first leg 2–0 against TeBe Berlin, in the second leg Asamoah netted the opener, as his side tied the aggregate and eventually gained promotion after the penalty shoot-outs. Adding his final season in Hannover, Asamoah played 79 games and scored 28 goals for the club.[10]

Schalke 04

In the summer transfer window of 1999, Asamoah moved to Schalke 04 for a reported cost of €1,35 million.[10] Despite having rarely hit double figures again during his prolonged time in Gelsenkirchen, the forward instantaneously became a favorite of supporters, thanks to his qualities both on and off the pitch, his good relationship with team-mates and coaches (especially Huub Stevens, who managed Asamoah for three years at Schalke) and his contributions to the club's successes during the first half of the 2000s.[8]

Asamoah training with Schalke 04 in March 2007.
Asamoah training with Schalke 04 in March 2007

With Die Knappen, the Ghanaian-German striker reached the qualification to the UEFA Champions League at the end of the 2000-01 season, before winning two consecutive German Cups (in 2001 and 2002), two UEFA Intertoto Cups (in 2003 and 2004) and a German League Cup (in 2005).[8]

Asamoah left Schalke at the end of the 2009-10 season, having registered a total of 381 games, 64 goals and 45 assists (between the national league, national cups and continental competitions) for the club over eleven years.[11]

The last years as a player

St. Pauli

On 1 June 2010, Asamoah signed a two-year contract with the then Bundesliga-promoted club FC St. Pauli.[12][13] During his time with the Kiezkicker, he played regularly and scored six goals in the league, including a winner that allowed his team to obtain their first away victory against cross-city rivals, Hamburger SV, since 1977.[14] However, St. Pauli didn't manage to avoid relegation to the 2. Bundesliga, having finished last in the league, and the striker eventually decided to terminate this contract in June 2011.[8]

Greuther Fürth

Asamoah celebrating Greuther Fürth's historical promotion in Bundesliga with his team-mates and head coach Mike Büskens in April 2012.
Asamoah celebrating Greuther Fürth's historical promotion in Bundesliga with his team-mates and head coach Mike Büskens in April 2012

After spending six months without a club and training with the non-professional side VfB Hüls to keep himself fit, Asamoah signed for Greuther Fürth on 10 January 2012.[15] Come during the second half of the season, Asamoah mainly acted as a reserve of Christopher Nöthe and Olivier Occéan, but still helped the team win the 2. Bundesliga title, as Greuther Fürth achieved their historical first promotion to the Bundesliga.[16]

However, the following year turned out to be more difficult than expected: Asamoah went goalless during the entire season, while the Kleeblätter finished at the bottom of the table, having won only four of their 34 league games, none of which were at home soil.[17]

This was also Asamoah's last season in the Bundesliga, as he amassed the third highest number of substitutions ever in the league (139 times).[8]

Return to Schalke and retirement

On 15 July 2013, it was announced that Asamoah would return to Schalke 04 as a player-coach for their reserve team.[5]

Having taken part in one more game for the senior side during a DFB Pokal match in 2013, the striker played regularly in the Regionalliga West, before ultimately announcing his retirement in 2015.[8]

International career

Asamoah training with the German national team in June 2005

In May 2001, Asamoah received his first senior call-up for the Germany national team by coach Rudi Völler and subsequently won his first international cap during a friendly match against Slovakia, making him the first African-born black player to ever play for the side: in fact, Erwin Kostedde and Jimmy Hartwig, two previous internationals with black ancestry, were both born in Germany to African-American fathers and German mothers. He also scored on his debut, at the 50th minute of the game.[8]

He then went on to play in the 2002 and 2006 World Cups, mainly as a reserve, and ended up collecting a total amount of 43 international caps and six goals for the German national team.[18]

Managerial career

Having previously served as a supervisor for the marketing area at Schalke while he was still playing for their reserve team, Asamoah was offered a role as assistant coach for the Royal Blues' U-15 squad immediately after his retirement, in July 2015.[19] In October of the same year, he obtained his UEFA A coaching licence.[20]

In November 2016, he was appointed as head coach of Schalke's U23 squad, a role he maintained until February 2021. Meanwhile, he served as the team manager for the senior team between March and June 2019, as he was temporarily promoted by interim head coach Huub Stevens.[8][21]

In February 2021, following internal turbulence within the club due to the extreme lack of results throughout the season, Asamoah was appointed as a coordinator for the first team, acting as a link between the players, the coaching team and the board.[22][7] However, Schalke could not prevent themselves from being relegated for the first time in over thirty years, as they finished at the bottom of the league table.[23][24]

In May 2021, the new-established sporting director Rouven Schröder decided to appoint Asamoah as Schalke's first-team manager for the following season, in collaboration with head coach Dimitrios Grammozis.[3]

Personal life

Asamoah is married and has two children, twins born on 26 February 2007.

Asamoah's brother Lewis (born 1984) has played as a footballer, too, spending his whole career in the non-professional tiers of the German football league pyramid, while his cousin Emmanuel (born 1993) played in the youth ranks of St. Pauli and Hamburg before seemingly stepping out of football in 2013.[25]

He suffers from a heart condition, named hypertrophic, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy. In his case, the flesh lobe that separates the right and left heart chambers is extremely thick, which can cause an arrhythmic heartbeat. While this condition didn't hold him back entirely from playing, it was one of the main reasons behind his frequent struggles with fitness.[8][26][27]

On 13 January 2016, Asamoah accepted the 2015 FIFA Fair Play Award on behalf of football organizations and clubs around the world, as he worked to support refugees in the face of conflict.[28]

He has also been leading educational campaigns in public schools and speaking out against racism in several occasions. In August 2019, he openly criticized Schalke's chairman of the supervisory board, Clemens Tönnies, due to his controversial claims against African people during a convention on climate change and the future of the food industry in Paderborn: Tönnies eventually maintained his role within the club's board until his own resignment, almost a year after.[29][30] In February 2020, Asamoah firmly condemned the racist insults directed towards opponent defender Jordan Torunarigha by Schalke supporters during a home cup match against Hertha BSC.[31] In June 2020, Asamoah joined the group of players and board members across Bundesliga who reacted and manifested support to the protests across the United States and the world following the murder of George Floyd, saying quote: "If you have never experienced racism, you'll never find out what that truly means. It's a pain you carry inside yourself and you can't swallow it. I'll work even harder to visit schools and teach young people that we're all the same."[8]

In 2021, he featured in Schwarze Adler [de], a documentary detailing the experiences of Black players in German professional football.[32]

Career statistics

Club

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
Club Season League DFB-Pokal Europe[a] Other Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Hannover 96 1996–97 Regionalliga Nord 25 5 1 0 2[b] 0 28 5
1997–98 33 19 3 0 2[b] 1 38 20
1998–99 2. Bundesliga[33] 21 4 1 0 22 4
Total 79 28 5 0 0 0 4 1 88 29
Schalke 04 1999–2000[33] Bundesliga 33 4 2 1 35 5
2000–01[33] 29 4 6 4 35 8
2001–02[33] 32 6 6 0 5 1 2[c] 0 45 7
2002–03[33] 27 3 3 1 6 0 2[c] 0 38 4
2003–04[33] 24 4 0 0 4 0 6[d] 1 34 5
2004–05[33] 31 8 5 1 7 1 6[d] 2 49 12
2005–06[33] 24 3 1 0 10 1 2[c] 0 37 4
2006–07[33] 13 2 1 2 2 0 16 4
2007–08[33] 31 7 3 3 10 1 3[c] 0 47 11
2008–09[33] 27 2 2 0 7 1 36 3
2009–10[33] 8 1 0 0 8 1
Total 279 44 29 12 51 5 21 3 380 64
Schalke 04 II 2003–04[33] Regionalliga Nord 1 0 0 0 1 0
FC St. Pauli 2010–11[33] Bundesliga 27 6 0 0 27 6
Greuther Fürth 2011–12[33] 2. Bundesliga 10 5 2 0 12 5
2012–13[33] Bundesliga 17 0 1 0 18 0
Total 27 5 3 0 0 0 0 0 30 5
Schalke 04 2013–14[33] Bundesliga 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Schalke 04 II 2013-14[33] Regionalliga West 28 6 28 6
2014-15[33] 21 2 21 2
Total 49 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 8
Career total 462 91 38 12 51 5 25 4 576 112
  1. ^ Includes UEFA Champions League, UEFA Europa League
  2. ^ a b Includes appearances in 2. Bundesliga playoffs
  3. ^ a b c d Appearances in DFL-Ligapokal
  4. ^ a b Includes appearances in UEFA Intertoto Cup

International

Appearances and goals by national team and year[34]
National team Year Apps Goals
Germany 2001 7 1
2002 10 1
2003 1 0
2004 7 1
2005 11 3
2006 7 0
Total 43 6
Scores and results list Germany's goal tally first, score column indicates score after each Asamoah goal.[34]
List of international goals scored by Gerald Asamoah
No. Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 29 May 2001 Weserstadion, Bremen, Germany  Slovakia 1–0 2–0 Friendly
2 13 February 2002 Fritz-Walter-Stadion, Kaiserslautern, Germany  Israel 6–1 7–1 Friendly
3 21 December 2004 Rajamangala Stadium, Bangkok, Thailand  Thailand 4–1 5–1 Friendly
4 4 June 2005 Windsor Park, Belfast, Northern Ireland  Northern Ireland 1–1 4–1 Friendly
5 21 June 2005 Frankenstadion, Nuremberg, Germany  Argentina 2–1 2–2 2005 Confederations Cup
6 17 August 2005 De Kuip, Rotterdam, Netherlands  Netherlands 2–2 2–2 Friendly

Honours

Schalke 04

Greuther Fürth

Germany

References

  1. ^ "2006 FIFA World Cup Germany: List of Players: Germany" (PDF). FIFA. 21 March 2014. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 June 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Asamoah, Gerald" (in German). kicker.de. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  3. ^ a b c "Sporting director Rouven Schröder fills key first-team positions - Fußball - Schalke 04". Fußball. 28 May 2021. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  4. ^ "Rouven Schröder: We need to be a community – and we need to act like one - Fußball - Schalke 04". Fußball. 28 May 2021. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Asamoah spielt wieder für Schalke" (in German). kicker.de. 15 July 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  6. ^ "Player Profile". BBC Sport. 7 May 2002. Retrieved 12 July 2012.
  7. ^ a b "Gerald Asamoah: Passing on my experience as a professional - Fußball - Schalke 04". Fußball. 16 March 2021. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Gerald Asamoah, un pezzo di storia dello Schalke dal cuore grande". OneFootball (in Italian). Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  9. ^ "Derbysieger! Meister! Vor 22 Jahren nimmt Hannover 96 die Hürde Eintracht Braunschweig". Sportbuzzer.de (in German). Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  10. ^ a b Arnhold, Matthias (4 June 2015). "Gerald Asamoah - Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 16 June 2015.
  11. ^ "FC St. Pauli verpflichtet Gerald Asamoah" (in German). Focus. 1 June 2010. Retrieved 22 June 2010.
  12. ^ "Asamoah geht zu St. Pauli – Rückkehr zum S04 vertraglich fixiert" (in German). FC Schalke 04. 1 June 2010. Archived from the original on 4 June 2010. Retrieved 22 June 2010.
  13. ^ "Asamoah wird Kiezkicker: 31-Jähriger erhält Zwei-Jahres-Vertrag" (in German). FC St. Pauli. 31 May 2010. Archived from the original on 6 July 2010. Retrieved 22 June 2010.
  14. ^ "Hamburger SV - FC St. Pauli, 0:1, Bundesliga 2010/11 21. Matchday". DFB data center. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  15. ^ "Fürth verpflichtet Asamoah" [Fürth signs Asamoah] (in German). DFL. 10 January 2012. Archived from the original on 10 January 2012. Retrieved 10 January 2012.
  16. ^ Welle (www.dw.com), Deutsche. "Greuther Fürth set to begin first-division debut | DW | 20 August 2012". DW.COM. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  17. ^ "Runs, records and retirement". FIFA.com. Archived from the original on 18 December 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  18. ^ Arnhold, Matthias (4 June 2015). "Gerald Asamoah - International Appearances". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 16 June 2015.
  19. ^ "Gerald Asamoah wird Vereinsbotschafter und Co-Trainer der U15 - Aktuell - Schalke04.de". 1 July 2015. Archived from the original on 1 July 2015. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  20. ^ derwesten.de, DerWesten- (26 October 2016). "Schalke-Legende Asamoah hat die Trainer A-Lizenz erworben". derwesten.de (in German). Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  21. ^ "Gerald Asamoah: Habe mehrere Ziele mit der U23 - Aktuell - Schalke04.de". 3 December 2016. Archived from the original on 3 December 2016. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  22. ^ "FC Schalke 04 relieve sporting management of their duties with immediate effect - Fußball - Schalke 04". Fußball. 28 February 2021. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  23. ^ "Schalke relegated from the Bundesliga: The inside story of a Royal Case of the Blues | DW | 21 April 2021". DW.com. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  24. ^ Selldorf, Philipp. "Abstieg von Schalke 04: Unvermeidliches Ende in Bielefeld". Süddeutsche.de (in German). Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  25. ^ "1.FC Wülfrath: Lewis und Gerald Asamoah über Neid, Gegenspieler und Zukunft" [1.FC Wülfrath: Lewis and Gerald Asamoah about envy, opponents and future] (in German). reviersport.de. 7 August 2007. Retrieved 7 March 2010.
  26. ^ "Gerald Asamoah "I know that I'm playing with my life"". FIFA. 14 January 2002. Retrieved 22 June 2010.[dead link]
  27. ^ "Gott weiß, was er tut". Der Spiegel (in German). 9 November 1998. Retrieved 16 February 2011.
  28. ^ "FACTSheet FIFA awards" (PDF). FIFA. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 January 2016. Retrieved 19 January 2016.
  29. ^ "Clemens Tönnies e le frasi razziste: ecco cosa è successo". Bundesitalia.com (in Italian). 18 August 2019. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  30. ^ "Clemens Tönnies steps down from his role at FC Schalke 04 - Fußball - Schalke 04". Fußball. 30 June 2020. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  31. ^ Zeitung, Süddeutsche. "Hertha: Torunarigha rassistisch auf Schalke beleidigt". Süddeutsche.de (in German). Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  32. ^ Bülau, Maximilian (19 April 2021). "Von Mbom bis Kostedde: Das sind die Protagonisten der Amazon-Dokumentation "Schwarze Adler"". HNA (in German). Retrieved 18 June 2021.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "Gerald Asamoah » Club matches". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  34. ^ a b Gerald Asamoah at National-Football-Teams.com

External links

  • Gerald Asamoah at fussballdaten.de (in German)
  • Gerald Asamoah at WorldFootball.net
  • Gerald Asamoah at National-Football-Teams.com
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