Ma Wanfu

Ma Wanfu
Traditional Chinese馬萬福
Simplified Chinese马万福
Transcriptions
Standard Mandarin
Hanyu PinyinMǎ Wànfú

Ma Wanfu (Xiao'erjing: ﻣَﺎ وًا ﻓُﻮْ; 1849–1934), also known as Hajji Guoyuan (果园哈只),[1] was a Dongxiang Imam of Guoyuan village (果园村) in Hezhou (present day Dongxiang Autonomous County in Linxia Hui Autonomous Prefecture, Gansu Province). He studied in Mecca and founded[2] the Ikhwan (Yihewani 伊赫瓦尼) movement in 1888, also known as the "New Sect" (Chinese Xinjiao pai, 新教派 or Xinxinjiao, 新新教), spreading in Gansu, Ningxia and Qinghai. He (along with the Yihewani movement) opposed Sufism.[3]

Life

Ma Wanfu supported the Dungan revolt (1895–1896) against the Qing Dynasty, along with Ma Dahan and Ma Yonglin, but the rebellion was crushed by Chinese Muslim Hui forces led by Dong Fuxiang, Ma Anliang, Ma Fuxiang, Ma Fulu and Ma Guoliang. Ma Wanfu surrendered, betraying the fellow Dongxiang rebel leader Ma Dahan.[4][5]

In 1915, Ma Anliang and Yang Zengxin arrested and attempted to execute Ma Wanfu, when Ma Qi rescued him as he was being shipped to execution and brought him to Xining.[6][7]

Literature

  • Hu Fan: Islam in Shaanxi: Past and Present. Diss. Bonn 2008
  • Ma Kexun 马克勋: "Zhongguo Yisilanjiao Yihewanyi pai di changdaozhe – Ma Wanfu (Guoyuan)" 中国伊斯兰教伊赫瓦尼派的倡导者——马万福(果园) [The Founder of China's Islamic Ikhwan movement: Ma Wanfu]. In: Yisilanjiao zai Zhongguo [Islam in China], ed. Gansu Provincial Ethnology Department. Yinchuan: Ningxia Renmin chubanshe 1982 (Chinese)
  • Ma Zhanbiao: "Yihewani jiaopei yu Ma Wanfu" (Yihewani und Ma Wanfu), In: Xibei Huizu yu Yiselanjiao. Yinchuan: Ningxia Renmin chubanshe 1994
  • Mikko Suutarinen: The Dongxiang People of Gansu – Ethnic, Religious and Local Identities (Religious Identity) (PDF format; 320 kB)
  • Dillon, Michael (1999). China's Muslim Hui Community: Migration, Settlement and Sects. Psychology Press. ISBN 978-0-7007-1026-3.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2 October 2011. Retrieved 15 June 2010.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "回族历史大事记 - 沙梁子". Archived from the original on 17 May 2009. Retrieved 15 June 2010.
  3. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 July 2011. Retrieved 23 June 2010.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Jonathan Neaman Lipman (2004). Familiar strangers: a history of Muslims in Northwest China. Seattle: University of Washington Press. p. 168. ISBN 0-295-97644-6. Retrieved 28 June 2010.
  5. ^ Michael Dillon (1999). China's Muslim Hui community: migration, settlement and sects. Richmond: Curzon Press. p. 102. ISBN 0-7007-1026-4.
  6. ^ Jonathan Neaman Lipman (2004). Familiar strangers: a history of Muslims in Northwest China. Seattle: University of Washington Press. p. 207. ISBN 0-295-97644-6.
  7. ^ Aliya Ma Lynn (2007). Muslims in China. University Press. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-88093-861-7.

External links

  • Ma Wanfu – Chinese
  • Birth and Growth of Sects and Menhuans – English
  • Yihewani sect – English
  • Huizu lishi dashiji – Chinese
  • Ikhwani – English
  • Zhongguo Yisilanjiao Yihewanyi pai de changdaozhe Ma Wanfu – Chinese
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